Woodworkers Source Blog
Finishing Tips & Project Help from Your Friendly Lumber Supplier

When we say walnut looks great with a finish, you’re probably asking, “Um… which finish?” Good question. However the answer isn’t exactly a simple one because you can apply dozens of techniques to walnut and the wood will . . . look great. But here are three really good ways to give walnut a nice appearance in
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width=”800″ height=”600″ frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=”allowfullscreen”> Yep, that’s Norm Abram. You’re going to want to watch this. No doubt about it, with a table saw and a router, a modern day woodworker is an unstoppable force. But the table saw is the most ubiquitous woodworking tool of our age. Indeed, it’s what separates woodworkers from, well, their neighbors-who-need-a-favor. If
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If there’s one thing to understand about creating a rustic or distressed finish in alder woodworking projects, it’s this: there is no wrong answer. But still, maybe you want a handful of ideas to get your creative gears greased up. Indeed, of all wood finishes, rustic/aged techniques are probably the most fun to do – perhaps
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width=”800″ height=”450″ frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=”allowfullscreen”> Since European beech is very close-grained and dense, you can get a wonderfully smooth and flawless finish on the wood with very little trouble. Prepping the wood goes quickly, too, as abrasive sandpaper cuts this wood fast – unlike hard maple, which shares a similar density and light color. However, European beech is a
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hand planing wood for woodworking

Every month we feature a different hardwood by stocking up with fresh new inventory and by slashing the price by 25% or more. But did you know that every month we also provide a chance for you to test out the wood and get a feel for it yourself?  In every one of our stores you
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Over the last few months, I’ve whittled up a healthy number of Baltic birch sheets to build a wide array of projects. A router table and fence, several drawer boxes, a craft table. In the same months, I’ve seen my colleagues use Baltic birch to make a table saw cross cut sled, a glue rack,
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Walnut board dyed and stained

width=”800″ height=”500″ frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=”allowfullscreen”> Few people approve of pale sapwood in their walnut lumber,  but in the words of  Jim, a salesman at one of our faithful walnut suppliers back east, “When people ask me for a 100% heartwood face in walnut, I just tell them they’re dreaming.” You may be tired of hearing that
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height=”422″ width=”750″ allowfullscreen=”” frameborder=”0″> Covering the edges of plywood or melamine on your woodworking project can be done several ways. One of the most favorable is to use solid wood edging, and there are multiple ways to do this too. A straightforward method is to glue 3/4″ x 1-1/2″ strips to the plywood edge and
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height=”500″ width=”700″ allowfullscreen=”” frameborder=”0″> We all love quarter sawn oak for the remarkable figure. And, yes, it makes some downright fantastic furniture because of both the beautiful appearance and its excellent durability. There’s just one problem. When you want to make table tops, door panels, or tall drawer fronts out of the wood, good chance
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height=”413″ width=”550″ allowfullscreen=”” frameborder=”0″> Here’s yet another helpful video by George Vondriska from Woodworkers Guild of America, and in this one he explains how logs are sawn and how different parts of the tree produce different grain patterns. Flat sawn lumber is the most economical way to saw a log and the process produces grain
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frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen> It’s a simple reality that walnut used in woodworking projects has two troublesome traits. First, the natural dark color of walnut will fade over time due to UV light exposure. The process is slow, but it happens. Second, walnut lumber contains some pale sapwood, depending on your tastes, you either like it or
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Gluing up boards to make solid cabinet doors and table tops remains a necessary and time-consuming part of woodworking. And many woodworkers out there avoid glue-ups because of the machinery (or exhausting hand work) required to get a newly glued-up solid wood panel nice and flat. It takes a wide planer, wide sander, or unyielding
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