Few people approve of pale sapwood in their walnut lumber,  but in the words of  Jim, a salesman at one of our faithful walnut suppliers back east, “When people ask me for a 100% heartwood face in walnut, I just tell them they’re dreaming.” You may be tired of hearing that sapwood isn’t considered a …Read More

We all love quarter sawn oak for the remarkable figure. And, yes, it makes some downright fantastic furniture because of both the beautiful appearance and its excellent durability. There’s just one problem. When you want to make table tops, door panels, or tall drawer fronts out of the wood, good chance you’ll go looking for …Read More

Here’s yet another helpful video by George Vondriska from Woodworkers Guild of America, and in this one he explains how logs are sawn and how different parts of the tree produce different grain patterns. Flat sawn lumber is the most economical way to saw a log and the process produces grain patterns that are wide …Read More

It’s a simple reality that walnut used in woodworking projects has two troublesome traits. First, the natural dark color of walnut will fade over time due to UV light exposure. The process is slow, but it happens. Second, walnut lumber contains some pale sapwood, depending on your tastes, you either like it or not. However, …Read More

Here’s a hardwood you really don’t want to miss: Sapele Take a look: That’s the real stuff.  You can see that it shares a likeness with mahogany, but still has a personality all of its own. Sapele comes from massive trees of 150 feet tall, and over 4 feet in diameter.  To make it better, …Read More

Mahogany: Which one is the real thing?

Any discussion of Mahogany may be complex and confusing because there has been a lot of change in the past few years and the term “mahogany” has been applied to several woods for marketing purposes. There is no botanical connection among these different woods. I will try to keep this short and to the point …Read More

I doubt you need any form of begging or persuading from me to understand that one moment spent looking at a perfect board of rosewood will put your personal woodworking goals into a tailspin. Oh right, you thought you were going to build that cabinet out of hard maple?  Hickory?  Just one moment with a …Read More

It starts with a sweaty trip to a sawmill in a far-off jungle….When the guys started pushing an 8-foot-long log through the 8-inch-wide bandsaw blade (and said bandsaw was taller than a pro basketball player and wider than a pro football player), the log looked like something you wouldn’t dare bring home to mom. It …Read More

8 Reasons Why Bubinga Is Awesome

Let’s just say you and I are walking in a forest in Cameroon, a smallish country in Central Africa that’s roughly the size of California. Walking in the forest of Cameroon is no ordinary experience. It’s home to several endangered primates, and a mind-blowing number of tropical birds. The air here is thick and humid …Read More

Stripes, colors, and all kinds of shapes characterize this set of wood turnings from Jim King. There’s even a piece made from spalted bloodwood, which I find highly unusual. I want to know more about the wine dispenser.  Is the wine chamber wood only, or is there a container of some kind inside?

Check out this second set of fun turnings from Jim King down in the Peruvian Amazon.  He’ll be commenting on these incredible woods he used down below …. In the mean time, click on the pictures to see a larger version.  I’m interested in that multi-part vessel at the end:

You’re going to get a kick out of these turnings. Some are inside out or exceptionally intricate.  Others look like regular ol’ bowls.  But all of them use a special and unusual wood that echos the beauty of the forest from which they came. Of course, let me not fail to mention these were turned …Read More

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