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Archive for April, 2013

How to Build a Folding Workshop Table with 3 Tops: Router Table, Down-Draft Sanding Table, General Work Table

Friday, April 12th, 2013

Every month we host a free woodworking demonstration at our stores, and each one is taught by our esteemed demo man, Joe. Due to the nature of his “traveling woodworking show,” he built this fold down table that does a few cool things:

  • Easy to store and set up
  • Sturdy enough for many woodworking operations like routing and assembly
  • Table top changes out for special applications: router table, down-draft sanding table, general purpose work table.

The quick video above shows how it works. Is it a robust workbench? Obviously not. However, it is a handy table that can serve a number of purposes for you in your own shop.

Joe pieced together sketches and a parts/materials list you can download and use for making your own table.

Click here for a link to plans in PDF form.

Three tops you can make:

  • Router table
  • Basic work table
  • Downdraft sanding table

What Does Quarter Sawn and Flat Sawn Mean? What’s the Difference and Why Do I Care?

Friday, April 12th, 2013

Here’s yet another helpful video by George Vondriska from Woodworkers Guild of America, and in this one he explains how logs are sawn and how different parts of the tree produce different grain patterns. Flat sawn lumber is the most economical way to saw a log and the process produces grain patterns that are wide and cathedral like. Quarter sawn, on the other hand, is more labor intensive and therefore more expensive to buy. Quarter sawn boards have a straight grain pattern, and the lumber is generally more stable than flat sawn. In this video, Vondriska illustrates how this is done by using a slice of a log to show us what’s going on. Enjoy.